Sunday, January 17, 2016

Frenched Pork Rack Roast with Montreal Steak Spice.

Today we are going to look at a very flavourful and relatively easy way to make a "frenched" pork roast.

A frenched pork roast is like the Prime Rib of pork. It is fatty, bone-in and, properly prepared, very moist and truly delicious. Plus, once carved everyone gets their own, perfectly cooked bone-in pork chop!

There are many seasoning blends that can be used on a pork roast. Salt, pepper and minced garlic with some olive oil works nicely. But I find that Montreal Steak Spice seasoning (as made by Club House among others) works perfectly.

First, take out your roast and season liberally on top (the fatty side is the top -- as with a Prime Rib the bone side is the bottom and you stand the roast on the bones) with the Montreal Steak Spice. Let stand, seasoned, at room temperature for 30 minutes. For the cooking times in this recipe we used a roast in the 3-4 lb. range.

When ready, put the roast onto an aluminum foil lined  roasting pan and place in the middle of an oven preheated to 400 degrees.

Roast at 400 for 1 hour. After an hour lower heat to 325 and roast for around another 30 minutes or until the roast reads around 150 degrees on a meat thermometer. Remember, the roast will rise by 10-15 degrees when left to rest after cooking.

When the roast is ready, remove from oven and let rest at room temperature for `15 minutes.

Carve the roast by slicing it in between each bone so that a lush bone-in chop portion is created. While terrific on its own I like to serve with a Dijon-mayonnaise sauce on the side. I make this by mixing two parts mayonnaise with one part Dijon. I like to also add a few dashes of hot sauce like Tabasco or Cholula.

This pairs well with any number of sides, like mashed potatoes, salad or rice and goes nicely with either white or red wine.


See also:   Diner Style Breaded Pork Chops in Gravy

See also: Standing Prime Rib Roast done two ways: On the BBQ or in the oven with mushroom gravy

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